Florist Weddings

The best wedding flowers

Taken from The Knot

Picture yourself walking through a glorious garden with every flower at its peak. Which flowers would you pick for your wedding? The commonplace? The colorful? The rarest? Most fragrant? Unscented? Having trouble deciding from the thousands of varieties available? To help you narrow down your bouquet and centerpiece choices before you meet with your florist, we offer this overview of the top 10 most popular wedding flowers.

1. Rose

Assorted pink and peach garden roses
PHOTO BY VANESSA PREZIOSE PHOTOGRAPHY 

Long considered a symbol of beauty and love, the rose figures into many myths and fairy tales. Romantic writers and poets have used the flower as a metaphor for emotion, beauty, passion, and true love throughout the ages. An all-star in the world of weddings, the rose is far from boring, particularly when it comes to color — the rose is available in solid colors and bicolor varieties, and there are striped roses and tipped roses as well. More than three thousand varieties of roses are grown commercially, many available year-round and that are surprisingly affordable. And though roses are associated with luxurious fragrance, not every rose is scented. Three main types are likely candidates for your wedding flowers: hybrid tea roses (the classic, uniformly-shaped commercial roses generally seen at your local florist), spray roses (a rose with five to ten small heads on each stem and a “natural, garden-grown” look), and garden roses (expensive, old-fashioned varieties with bushy, open heads and delicious scents).

Learn more about roses — the quintessential wedding flower!

2. Tulip

Bright colored tulip bouquets
PHOTO BY JESSICA MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

Although it’s most often associated with the Netherlands, this flower is actually a native of Persia. Representing “consuming love” and “happy years,” the tulip can be a meaningful wedding choice. The flowers are grown in a wide range of colors, including white and cream; pastels like pink, yellow, and peach; and vibrant hues like magenta, red, and purple. Available during much of the year, the most common tulips are very affordable, though rare varieties can be expensive. The versatile tulip can enhance both elegant wedding settings and more casual venues, and work well in almost any permutation — from bouquets to boutonnieres to table arrangements. Three main varieties are commonly used: Dutch tulips (typically seen at neighborhood florist shops and in gardens), French tulips (expensive and elegant, with extra-long stems and large tapered blooms), and parrot tulips (noted for their ruffled, striped petals in intense colors).

3. Calla Lily

Dark purple calla lily bouquet
PHOTO BY SHIPRA PANOSIAN

Also known as the arum lily, this elegant, trumpet-shaped blossom originated in Africa and symbolizes “magnificent beauty” in the language of flowers. The calla lily’s distinctive form has been depicted in Art Nouveau and Art Deco works, in addition to twentieth-century photography. Two types are commonly available: a large-headed variety with a long, smooth stem and suitable for tall arrangements or presentation-style bouquets, and a miniature version ideal for nosegays and boutonnieres. Creamy ivory is the most popular color, but calla lilies also come in yellow, orange, mauve-pink, and dark purple.

4. Lily of the Valley

White lily of the valley bouquet
PHOTO BY TANJA LIPPERT PHOTOGRAPHY 

With bell-shape florets dangling from a thin stem, the lily of the valley is sometimes called “the ladder to heaven.” The fresh, perfumed scent from its tiny flowers is unmistakable. In Norse mythology, the flower is linked to Ostara, the goddess of springtime, and while most plentiful during this season, it remains available — and very expensive — most of the year. So while a fistful of lily of the valley might be your dream, a more affordable alternative may be to use just a few stems to infuse a bouquet or centerpiece with its wonderful fragrance. Most people know of the white variety, but lily of the valley also comes in a very rare rosy-pink.

5. Hydrangeas

Blue hydrangea centerpieces
PHOTO BY ROBIN PROCTOR

With its big bushy head and intense shades of pink, blue, burgundy, and purple, it’s no wonder that the hydrangea represented “vanity” in the Victorian language of flowers. One of the most popular varieties changes in color as it grows from bubble-gum pink to sky blue, depending on the acid level of the soil. A stem or two of this moderately priced, scentless shrub flower helps fill out arrangements and bouquets, and a few sprigs make a charming boutonniere. You’ll find the hydrangea in white and shades of green, pink, burgundy, and blue.

6. Peony

Pink and white peony centerpiece
PHOTO BY KATE HEADLEY

The peony has a large, full head, strong perfume, and bright color. But despite this outward showiness, the flower acquired the Victorian meaning “bashfulness.” Cultivated in Asia for more than a thousand years and developed further by the French, the peony is available in two main types, the herbaceous and the tree peony (the latter’s flowers do not last as long when cut). A bouquet made solely of peonies can be gorgeous; the flower can also be used to create beautiful centerpieces and arrangements. Grown in single- and double-flower styles, this expensive bloom is seasonally available from late spring to early summer but can be imported in the fall.

7. Ranunculus

Pink and yellow ranunculus boutonnieres
PHOTO BY MI BELLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Looking for a cost-effective alternative to roses or peonies? Try the lush, multi-petaled ranunculus, a relative of the buttercup. First seen by Westerners in the Far East around the thirteenth century, this mild-scented flower features several blossoms on a stem with fernlike foliage. To carry ranunculus is to tell your partner, in the Victorian language of flowers, “I am dazzled by your charms.” A natural for the bridal bouquet or bridesmaid nosegays, the ranunculus also makes a whimsical boutonniere and is available in many colors including white, yellow, orange, and pink.

8. Stephanotis

White stephanotis bouquet
PHOTO BY CALLAWAY GABLE

The Victorian meaning for this flower is “marital happiness,” making the dainty white Stephanotis an obvious choice for weddings. The star-shape, waxy florets actually grow on a flowering vine; each must be individually wired or placed onto a special holder before it can be arranged. A bouquet of stephanotis blossoms is one of the most traditional a bride can carry, and a stephanotis boutonniere is a classic choice for a formal wedding. Mildly scented, moderately priced (but you’ll pay for labor if your florist is assembling a bouquet), and available year-round.

9. Sweet Peas

Purple sweet pea in a silver vase
PHOTO BY MELISSA ROBOTTI

The sweet pea, which signifies “lasting pleasure,” was first brought to England from Sicily in 1699, and the English have had a love affair with this delicate flower ever since. Its candy-like scent and ruffled blossoms make this an old-fashioned favorite in bouquets for the bride and her bridesmaids. The sweet pea’s many colors range from white to intense pinks and purples, and its scent can be strong and sweet.

10. Gardenia

Gardenia flower in a bridal up do
PHOTO BY Q WEDDINGS

Surrounded by dark green, waxy leaves, the exquisite gardenia exudes a sultry, heavy scent. It was this intoxicating fragrance that captivated an English sea captain traveling through South Africa in 1754, prompting him to bring home one of the native plants as a souvenir. Gardenias are lovely tucked into a bouquet or floating in a low bowl as a centerpiece, and a single gardenia makes a wonderful scented corsage or hair accessory. But be gentle: the delicate, creamy ivory petals of this expensive flower can bruise easily. Large three- to four-inch blossoms, as well as a miniature variety, are available.

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Florist London Ontario

Appropriate flowers for funerals

Taken from Everplans

This article on Funerals is provided by Everplans — The web’s leading resource for dealing with death. Create, store and share important documents that your loved ones might need.

Before you tell the florist to “put something nice together,” take a minute to learn what your flowers might actually be saying.

When choosing flowers, the arrangement you pick should tell the same story as the relationship you had with the person. Was the deceased the love of your life? A close or distant family member? A dear friend? Here’s some tips to help you make the right floral decision.

Lilies

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When someone says, “This place smells like a funeral home” chances are there is a lily nearby. This is often considered the go-to funeral flower and there’s significant meaning behind this strongly aromatic blossom. Lilies suggest that the soul of the deceased has returned to a peaceful state of innocence.

Guru Tip: Christians think this flower symbolizes purity, virginity, and the radiance of the soul.  It’s believed that the Virgin Mary’s tomb was covered in this flower.

Peace Lily Plant

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Similar to the flower, the peace lily plant symbolizes innocence and rebirth of the departed’s soul from the complex physical world to a greater place.

Guru Tip: This is what I usually send to people I know who are grieving. I love how this plant will last for a while in the person’s home of office.

Roses

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Just like lilies, roses are a very common and appropriate funeral flower, and each color rose has a slightly different connotation. White roses are the ultimate symbol of spirituality, purity, and innocence. At a funeral, the classic deep red rose evokes love and grief. The yellow rose is often given by friends to show their bond. The rarer dark pink roses are used to express thankfulness to the deceased.

Guru Tip: Roses can be mixed in with other flowers or uses in a casket spray, standing spray, or wreath.

Orchid

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Guru Tip: Orchid plants make particularly special gifts. Unlike orchids in an arrangement, these last longer in the home or office.

Chrysanthemums (“Mums”)

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Unlike other flowers, the meaning behind chrysanthemums varies globally. In America and Europe, the meanings focus on sympathy and honor. The color plays a role in the meaning as well. Red symbolizes love, while white symbolizes innocence.

Guru Tip: In Asia, chrysanthemums symbolize rebirth and are more often given at baby showers than funerals.

Carnations

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Carnations are often used in funeral wreaths and standing sprays. As with other flowers, each of the colors has its own meaning. The red shows affection and the white tends to symbolize innocence. For Catholic and Christian funerals, pink carnations might be a good choice since it’s believed they were created from the Virgin Mary’s tears.

Guru Tip: Talented florist use carnations to create beautiful arrangements replicating sports logos, favorite activities and other personalized tributes. For some very good examples, check out this site.

Hyacinth

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These are mostly added into an arrangement of assorted flowers. There are a variety of thoughts behind the meaning, ranging from “you’re included in my prayers” to deep anguish.

Guru Tip: Some believe this flower symbolizes sports, games, and rashness so be careful not to insult!

Hydrangea

hydrangea-plant-750

The meaning behind this flower is not as well-known as the others, but many believe it symbolizes true heartfelt emotions.

Guru Tip: As with the peace lily, the plant version of this flower will always last longer than the cut arrangement.

 

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Florist

Best selling flowers

Iris.  Iris’s are so gorgeous, just being given one would make her day. Pick one up from the florists, and surprise her with it on the way home.

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Sunflower.  There’s nothing like sunflowers to put a smile on your face.

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Wild Flowers.  With so many colors and styles, wild flowers are stunning.

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Lilac.

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Carnation.

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Orchid.

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Lily.  You don’t need many for a gorgeous bouquet, and they are so classy.

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Tulip.  Perfect for spring days, Tulips make gorgeous ‘Just because’ bouquets.

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Daisy.  

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Rose.  Roses are very romantic.

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